With all this talk about the odds against winning and how much money is wasted on lottery tickets, one may forget that people do win the jackpot once in a great while. Every now and then, we read about someone who won a huge jackpot of a few hundred million dollars and how he or she is planning on retiring, buying a new car, or giving a percentage to a favorite charity.
Lotteries have often been called a “tax on the poor,” and for good reason. The majority of lottery ticket buyers are in the lower income tax brackets. Often less educated about finances and less likely to save money for retirement, these lottery players don’t view the expense of a few lottery tickets as a major cash outlay. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth. In the long run, spending money on tickets that never win costs players more than just the face value of the tickets and prevents many people from ever getting out of debt.
I can not begin to tell you how much I appreciate the time and effort you took yesterday to advise and assist me in this real estate fiasco I am experiencing. You are very easy to talk to and very comfortable in manner, which made it easy to talk to you and explain my circumstances. I truly appreciate your thoughtful consideration in trying to make me feel better about the decisions I have made. I have taken everything you suggested under advisement and I plan to follow exactly. I look forward to taking a little break from the stress and will ponder the direction I will take from here. Again, a most sincere thank you for your help and assistance. You certainly can tell you enjoy your profession and you definitely have been of great service to me. Again, thank you! 

Players can either choose their own six numbers (five regular and one Powerball) or have the computer terminals randomly pick numbers for them. If every number on your ticket matches the winning numbers in the order they are drawn, you win the jackpot prize. There are also smaller prizes if you only have some of the correct numbers. Each ticket costs the player $1.
Discover how Manfred Sternberg and Associates can help you through estate planning and commercial litigation. We serve businesses, corporate and partnership clients in Greater Houston and throughout Texas, including such communities as Bellaire, River Oaks, Galleria, Clear Lake, Galveston, Pearland, Katy, Sugar Land, Spring, Tomball, The Woodlands, Montgomery, Alvin, Conroe, Kingwood, Humble, Harris County, Fort Bend County, Montgomery County, Brazoria County and Galveston County.
With all this talk about the odds against winning and how much money is wasted on lottery tickets, one may forget that people do win the jackpot once in a great while. Every now and then, we read about someone who won a huge jackpot of a few hundred million dollars and how he or she is planning on retiring, buying a new car, or giving a percentage to a favorite charity.
Winning the lottery, while a tempting dream of the get rich quick sect, is not a legitimate way to get rich. In fact, it’s really no different than gambling away your money in a casino, where the house almost always wins. With only a handful of winners versus millions and millions of losers, the lottery is a sucker’s game. If you want to be rich and have plenty of money in the bank in order to live the good life, don’t look to the lottery to make it happen!
Lotteries have often been called a “tax on the poor,” and for good reason. The majority of lottery ticket buyers are in the lower income tax brackets. Often less educated about finances and less likely to save money for retirement, these lottery players don’t view the expense of a few lottery tickets as a major cash outlay. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth. In the long run, spending money on tickets that never win costs players more than just the face value of the tickets and prevents many people from ever getting out of debt.
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