2 Power Play Prize Amount - A Power Play Match Five (5 + 0) prize is set at $2,000,000 regardless of the Power Play number selected. All other non-Grand prizes will be multiplied by the Power Play number selected.* Beginning with the October 7, 2015 drawing, prize tiers 3 - 9 will be multiplied by 2, 3, 4, 5 or 10 times when the Power Play feature is purchased.* The 10X Power Play multiplier will be available for drawings in which the initially advertised annuitized Grand Prize amount is $150 million or less. Click here to view the Power Play prize chart.
Determine the probability of each possible "win." This will depend upon the specific powerball or number game you're playing. If it's a six-digit number that you pick, there are nine possibilities for each position and six different positions. Since each outcome is equally likely, you'll need to calculate a permutation. Alternatively, the odds should be listed in the game's rules.[3]
Use the singleton method. A few years ago, a statistician discovered a statistical quirk in the production of scratch-off tickets, which can double your chances of winning if exploited correctly.[1] Basically, scratch off games operate under the assumption of "randomness," but can't be produced in a truly random way, because the lottery board needs to keep track of how many winning tickets are in circulation.
The $2 Powerball is bigger and better than ever! Jackpots start at $40 million and the second tier (Match 5 +0) prize is $1 Million! To play, choose five numbers from the first field of 69 numbers and one Powerball number from the second field of 26 numbers or simply ask your lottery retailer for a Quick Pick. For only $1 more per play, don't forget to power your play with Power Play® for a chance to increase your non-Grand Prize winnings! You can win $2 million for the second tier prize with Power Play! 

With all this talk about the odds against winning and how much money is wasted on lottery tickets, one may forget that people do win the jackpot once in a great while. Every now and then, we read about someone who won a huge jackpot of a few hundred million dollars and how he or she is planning on retiring, buying a new car, or giving a percentage to a favorite charity.
One example of this was the Missouri Lottery's promotion in the daily Pick 3. Normally a player has a 1/1000 chance of winning a $600 prize, making a $1 ticket worth only $0.60. The promotion was to draw a second winning combination on one randomly selected day of the week. Originally, the drawing to determine whether the bonus would occur that day held six white balls and one orange, but on the last day of the week, all six white balls had been removed, leaving only the orange ball and ensuring a double drawing on the last day. [4] This doubled the value of tickets for that drawing and converted them from an expected 40 percent loss to a 20 percent gain. See table 1 below for how the expected value varied that week.
Use the singleton method. A few years ago, a statistician discovered a statistical quirk in the production of scratch-off tickets, which can double your chances of winning if exploited correctly.[1] Basically, scratch off games operate under the assumption of "randomness," but can't be produced in a truly random way, because the lottery board needs to keep track of how many winning tickets are in circulation.

While lottery winners do not have to have an attorney to claim their tickets, having an experienced attorney representing you will help you avoid mistakes you will later regret as they significantly affect your fortune. And having a legal team taking each step with you can help you walk through this extremely daunting process with excitement rather than fear and worry.
Buying lottery tickets for fun once in a while won’t break the bank. Playing with money you don’t have, or that you will need later on, however, is a recipe for disaster. For those who decide to play responsibly, the good news is that a portion of the money that goes towards state lotteries is used for education and children’s programs. The only responsible way to play the lottery is to do so occasionally for fun, without any expectation of winning. When it turns into something else, you know it’s time to stop.
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