In the Mega Millions multi-state lottery, jackpots are split equally among all winners who match all numbers. If a player could ensure that he wouldn't have to split the jackpot, Mega Millions becomes a smart bet whenever the jackpot exceeds about $420 million, but this calculation doesn't account for the possibility of a split jackpot. It has been theorized that the ticket buying frenzies as the jackpot rises increases the likelihood of multiple winners sufficiently that the jackpot can never get large enough to give a ticket a positive expected value.[5]
The $2 Powerball is bigger and better than ever! Jackpots start at $40 million and the second tier (Match 5 +0) prize is $1 Million! To play, choose five numbers from the first field of 69 numbers and one Powerball number from the second field of 26 numbers or simply ask your lottery retailer for a Quick Pick. For only $1 more per play, don't forget to power your play with Power Play® for a chance to increase your non-Grand Prize winnings! You can win $2 million for the second tier prize with Power Play!
In 2008, there were 1.03 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled in the United States. Based on these odds, a lottery player living a single mile from a store selling lottery tickets is four times more likely to die in a car accident driving to the store than to win the Powerball jackpot. Winning doesn’t seem too likely now, does it? Keep those odds in mind the next time you drive to the store to buy lottery tickets!
The Sternberg Law Firm has represented my business interest and me personally for many years. Their ability to professionally handle general business law, complex commercial transactions and litigation has been critical to our success. This top notch, business-minded legal team has always kept our interests and objectives at the forefront while being a cost effective partner in servicing our legal needs. They are a rare breed in today’s legal community.
Lotteries have often been called a “tax on the poor,” and for good reason. The majority of lottery ticket buyers are in the lower income tax brackets. Often less educated about finances and less likely to save money for retirement, these lottery players don’t view the expense of a few lottery tickets as a major cash outlay. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth. In the long run, spending money on tickets that never win costs players more than just the face value of the tickets and prevents many people from ever getting out of debt.
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